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Archive for April, 2010

Last year, I had a great time participating in the Google Summer of Code with the Debian project. I had a neat project with some rather interesting implications for helping developers to package and maintain their work. It’s still a work-in-progress, of course, as many projects in open source are, but I was able to accomplish quite a bit and am proud of my work. I learned quite a bit about coding in C, working with Debian and met some very intelligent people.

My student peers were also very intelligent and great to learn from. I enjoyed meeting them virtually and discussing our various projects on the IRC channel as the summer progressed and the Summer of Code kicked into full swing. The Debian project in particular also helps arrange travel grants for students to attend the Debian Conference (this year, DebConf10 is being held in New York City!). DebConf provides a great venue to learn from other developers (both in official talks but also unofficial hacking sessions). As the social aspect is particularly important to Debian, DebConf helps people meet those with whom they are working with the most, thereby creating lifelong friendships and making open source fun.

I have had several interviews for internships, and the bit of my work experience most asked about is my time doing the Google Summer of Code. I really enjoyed seeing a project go from the proposal stage, setting a reasonable timeline with my mentor, exploring the state of the art, and most importantly, developing the software. I think this is the sort of indispensible industry-type experience we often lack in our undergrad education. We might have an honours thesis or presentation, but much of the work in the Google Summer of Code actually gets used “in the field.”

Developing software for people rather than for marks is significant in a number of ways, but most importantly it means there are real stakeholders that must be considered at all stages. Proposing brilliant new ideas is important, however, without highlighting the benefits they can have for various users, the reality is that it simply will not gain traction. Learning how to write proposals effectively is an important skill and working with my prospective mentor (at the time – he later mentored my project once it was accepted) to develop mine was tremendously useful for my future endeavours.

The way I see the Google Summer of Code is, in many ways, similar to an academic grant (and the stipend is about the same as well). It provides a modest salary (this year it’s US$5000) but more importantly, personal contact with a mentor. Mentors are typically veterans in software development or the Debian project and act in the same role as supervisors for post-graduate work: they help monitor your progress and propose new ideas to keep you on track.

The Debian Project is looking for more students and proposals. We have a list of ideas as well as application instructions available on our Wiki. As I will be going on internship starting May, I have offered to be a mentor this year. I look forward to seeing your submissions (some really interesting ones have already begun to filter in as the deadline approaches).

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