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For my Google Summer of Code project, I have been working with PerlQt4 bindings, which requires that I have Qt4 installed. While this is technically possible under a Win32 environment. Lots of people in the free software community vehemently oppose Windows, but while it has its flaws, I think overall the hardware support is still much better than Linux. True, this is because of Microsoft’s shady business practices, and because many companies keep their driver source code closed. I’m still using Windows XP Professional and quite happy with it, stability-wise and feature-wise.

As an Engineer, many applications we use on a regular basis are simply not available on Linux. They’re simply not replaceable with the current state of open source software, though there is some great stuff out there. Nonetheless, we’re still far from a point where engineers in general can switch to Linux — the application support is as important to an operating system as the kernel. Linux would be nothing without GNU’s binutils, for example.

I tried to install Debian first, as this is an environment I’m very familiar with. I use Debian on my development server, and it has worked wonders there. But everything I do on that server is command-line stuff. When trying to install a desktop environment, I followed the KDE Configuration Wizard, which isn’t too bad, but it expects an Internet connection throughout the process. The problem was that I didn’t have enough Ethernet cables to have both the desktop computer and my laptop plugged in at the same time, even though I had a wireless router set up, which meant I had to unplug the computer while updating packages, etc. Some of the updates took quite a bit of time, which was inconvenient for everyone else.

I eventually got the system to install, and told tasksel to set up a desktop environment. It was installing stuff, I typed ‘apt-get install kde’ and assumed everything would Just Work. After installing a whole bunch of stuff (which included a local install of mysqld, on a desktop machine?! — turns out it was due to one of KDE’s recommended packages, it starts with an A, I forget which). Anyway, then the environment didn’t “just work” as I had expected. Upon booting up my system, it just dropped me to a command line prompt. Fine, I thought, I’ll just use startx. But that was broken too. So after another few hours of fiddling I just gave up altogether.

While trying Ubuntu (the last time I had done so was probably in version 7 or so), I downloaded a recent image of Kubuntu 9.04, the Ubuntu flavour using KDE as a default desktop environment. It’s surprising that there has been lots of progress in Ubuntu and Linux in general. I have found that driver support is much better than it used to be, as it now detects my network card – a Broadcom 43xx chip – and does everything it needs to do. For the most part, my operating system “Just Works.” Great. This looks like something I might be able to slowly transition toward, completely replacing Windows except inside WINE or a Virtual Machine container.

Has Debian and Ubuntu made lots of progress? Sure. I can definitely see that Ubuntu is geared a lot more to the average user, while Debian provides bleeding-edge features to the power user. Unfortunately, despite being involved in packaging Perl modules for Debian, I fall into the former category. I’d really just like my desktop system to just work. Oh, and dual monitor support out-of-the-box would be nice too — I hear the new KDE and Gnome support this.

One thing Windows handles rather well is changing hardware profiles – when my computer is connected to its docking station, a ton of peripherals are attached. When I undock, they’re gone. Windows handles this rather gracefully. In Kubuntu, I got lots of notification boxes repeatedly telling me that eth2 was disconnected, etc. This sort of thing is undecipherable for the average user, so I’d really just like for these operating systems to be more human-friendly before they are ready for prime time on the desktop.

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